More than a dozen people have been confirmed dead after a series of tornadoes touched down in Alabama and Georgia on Sunday afternoon.

Fourteen people have died in Lee County, Alabama, according to Sheriff Jay Jones. Among the dead are both children and adults, he said.

At least 12 of those deaths occurred in an area about 5 to 6 miles south of Opelika, Alabama, Jones said.

“We have a pretty significant area of damage,” Jones told CNN’s Ana Cabrera. He estimated a path of destruction about half a mile wide stretched several miles to the east from where the tornado touched down.

Several people have been taken to a hospital with serious injuries, Jones said.

A fallen cell tower lies across U.S. Route 280 highway in Lee County, Alabama after what appeared to be a tornado struck in the area.
A fallen cell tower lies across U.S. Route 280 highway in Lee County, Alabama after what appeared to be a tornado struck in the area.

Authorities were prioritizing search and rescue efforts on Sunday evening, he said, but were hampered by the dwindling light.

It appeared Sunday evening that two tornadoes hit Lee County back-to-back within the span of one hour, CNN Meteorologist Gene Norman said.

At least a dozen tornadoes touched down in Alabama and Georgia on Sunday afternoon, according to the National Weather Service.

Alabama Gov. Kay Ivey extended the state of emergency that had been issued last month statewide due to tornadoes and severe weather.

“Our hearts go out to those who lost their lives in the storms that hit Lee County today,” she tweeted. “Praying for their families & everyone whose homes or businesses were affected. Officials from @AlabamaEma & other agencies are quickly working to provide assistance.”

Footage broadcast by CNN affiliate WRBL showed trees destroyed by the powerful winds and debris from leveled homes piled up on the side of the road.

Damage is shown in Alabama after tornadoes touched down.
Damage is shown in Alabama after tornadoes touched down.

Multiple homes suffered significant damage, Jones told WRBL, and multiple agencies are working to assist in the search for injured people inside their homes.

Norman said that according to the National Weather Service, an airport in Eufaula, Alabama, along the Alabama-Georgia border was destroyed, along with a fire station.

Selma, Alabama, where crowds had gathered to mark the anniversary of “Bloody Sunday,” the 1965 civil rights march incident, suffered thunderstorms, Norman said, but no tornadoes.

In Talbotton, Georgia, at least 15 structures were destroyed in a tornado on Sunday, including multiple homes and at least one apartment building, said Leigh Ann Erenheim, the emergency management director for Talbot County.

Six people suffered injuries, with the most severe being a possible broken leg, she said. Crews were checking on residents in the outer areas of town and working to open a shelter for people who have been displaced.

The first tornado watches were issued around noon, but were expected to remain in place for parts of Georgia and South Carolina through 11 p.m. ET Sunday, Norman said.

The tornadoes are part of the same system that is expected to bring winter weather to much of the eastern United States this week, Norman said.